FAQ

Who is Koller Products?

We engineered, developed and introduced small desk-top one piece injection molded aquarium kits in 1985. We design and manufacture our products..

Where are you located?
We are located in Shawnee, Kansas a suburb of Kansas City.
I am needing a part how do I order?
You will contact our customer service department and they will be happy to help you.
How do we contact you?
You can contact us at 800-545-1344 or email us at Customerc[email protected] You can also contact us through our website under customer care or our Facebook will also help you contact us. If after hours your call will be answered by our answering service and we will return your call as soon as we are in the office again.
How do I decide where to put my aquarium?
Pick a location away from direct sunlight, heat, or air conditioning. Direct sunlight can cause unwanted algae growth that can cover your rocks and decorations. Placement of the aquarium away from heating and air conditioning vents is also important, because it is easier to maintain proper aquarium temperature when the surrounding air temperature is relatively stable. Place the aquarium where you will be able to see and appreciate the beauty of your new aquarium.
How to choose the right fish for me?

Patience is important when establishing your new aquarium. Begin by talking to your pet store people about which fish are best suited for your aquarium, which fish are compatible with each other, and how many would be appropriate for your aquarium. Inform them that you have just set up a new aquarium so they can recommend hardy fish. Select fish that are healthy and active. Be sure that the fish are eating and acting normally. Check for ragged fins that can be caused by bacteria and white spots caused by parasites. Always choose healthy looking fish. Research their needs and compatibility before you make your purchase. This will give you a better fishkeeping experience. For example, goldfish (we do not recommend for aquariums under 10 gallons) are not tropical fish and like cooler water temperatures while tropical fish such as swordfish, platys, tetras, barbs, and cichlids like warmer environments.

Decide if you want to keep cold water or tropical fish. If you decide to keep a betta fish, your betta will prefer their tank temperature between 72° and 79°F for optimal comfort and metabolic efficiency, if ambient room temperature is constant at these temperatures you will not have to add a heater. If you find the room to be cooler there are low wattage heaters you can add to this fish tank. By under stocking or stocking slowly, your tank will be more efficient at colonizing beneficial bacteria, you will lose less fish and the nitrogen cycle will become established faster with less dramatic spikes in ammonia and nitrite levels. Even after the “cycle” is established, overstocking can lead to inevitable problems.

Do I need a heater?

Coldwater Fish

There are several different species of fish that qualify as cold-water fish and tend to do better in colder water temperatures. Goldfish are included in this category but are not recommended for smaller aquariums (under 10 gallon). Gold fish grow very fast and can easily overload a smaller tank with waste. Choose a more suitable fish species for the size aquarium you intend to keep. A lot of true cold water fish cannot tolerate the warm water that we generally keep tropical fish in. A water temperature between 65ºF and 72ºF provides an optimum environment for these fish.

Goldfish are happiest when their aquarium water temperature is between 65ºF and 72ºF. If your ambient room temperature remains constant and does not fluctuate there’s a good chance that you may not need to add an aquarium heater. Use an aquarium thermometer to monitor tank temperature. If you see that the water temperature is bouncing up and down then add a small heater to keep the temperature steady at the same temperature.

Tropical Fish

Tropical fish are most healthy in the range of 74 ºF to 80°F. Some tropical fish may need to be kept cooler while some may need a warmer temperature. Check with your local aquarium store or online for the temperature requirements that best suit your fish.

Betta Fish

If you own a Betta fish, you might be wondering if you need an aquarium heater. The answer is yes, Bettas are tropical fish that prefer warm water ideally between 74 ºF to 80°F.

How many fish can I put in my aquarium?
When starting out it is best to add one or two fish and wait 2 weeks so the aquarium becomes established and beneficial bacteria begin growing unless you add products that speed up this process. Typically, it takes 4 to 6 weeks for a tank to cycle through and become established. So it is always best to start slowly. Generally, the number of fish you can keep in your tank depends on the type of fish and amount of Bio load in your tank. Bio load is the sum total of all living organisms in a defined area, it is everything alive in the aquarium. A good recommendation is an inch of fish per gallon of tank, measuring the length of the fish from the base of the tail to the opposite end. The exception to this rule is the Goldfish species. Goldfish grow fast and can grow very large if they have the room. This makes this simple rule ineffective in regards to Goldfish.
How do I put new fish into my aquarium?
When placing new fish in your tank, always float the bag for 10-15 minutes, this will enable them to acclimate to the aquarium’s water temperature. Start out by removing a couple of cups of water out of your fish tank. Now open the bag with fish and place it on the aquariums water’s surface, making sure the bag does not collapse. Every 2 minutes add ½ cup of tank water to the bag. After 10-15 minutes remove bag with fish and over another container pour the bag and fish into a fish net. Do not use the water from the store as unwanted disease can transfer easily. Gently add your fish into the aquarium.
How does a power filter work?
Power filters are used to keep your aquarium looking crystal clear and heathy, cleaning and purifying the aquarium’s water, effectively removing organic pollutants including colors, odors, heavy metals, and toxic gases. Power filters function by drawing water through the filter cartridge, all-the-while removing fish waste and other debris, returning cleansed water back to the aquarium and your fish.
How often should I feed my fish?
Overfeeding your aquarium is one of the most common mistakes made in aquarium ownership and is the major causes of fish loss. Overfeeding results in the accumulation of waste due to uneaten, leftover fish food plus increased amounts of waste produced by the fish eating more than they need. It’s easy to feed extra since your fish always appears hungry and is seems happy to see you especially when it’s feeding time. Keep in mind that your fish will always become excited when they see you coming towards the tank with food. Don’t be fooled by their ability to look hungry as this is typically only a conditioned feeding response when you approach the tank. Your fish should be fed small amounts of pelleted or flake food twice a day, no more than they can eat in a minute or two.
What information should I know before having a fish tank?
  • Feed your fish small amounts every other day or half that amount each day, but only what they will eat in about 1 to 2 minutes. Do not overfeed.
  • Check your equipment, e.g. filter systems and heater to make sure they are operating properly.
  • Check water temperature to make sure it is within the acceptable range of 75 degrees F-79 degrees F.
  • Check your fish and water. Consult your pet store if fish appear listless or weak, if you see white spots (ick) on your fish or notice a change in their normal behavior, e.g. heavy breathing, erratic swimming, loss of appetite, or if water appears cloudy. Be sure to bring a sample of your aquarium water. Water that appears cloudy, yellowish, or smells bad is indicative of poor water quality. A 25% dechlorinated water change and a new filter cartridge is recommended to correct these conditions.
Is the Polymer in the aquariums as good as glass?
Yes, the polymer we use to manufacture our aquarium tanks is as safe for fish as glass. Our one piece injection molded tanks are seamless, unlike a glass tank that is made in numerous pieces and glued together. Always inspect and test all tanks for damage that can occur during transportation and handling. Place the tank in a sink or other area that cannot be damaged by water for testing. Fill the tank and let stand for at least an hour before setting up your tank.
My water gets very cloudy in just a few days, Why?
This is a common condition in a new aquarium as they cycle through and become a stable environment for the fish. Leave the tank alone, keeping everything in operation. The cloudiness should disappear in a few days and is not harmful to the fish. If after two weeks do a partial water change. That should fix any issues your having. If it does not please make sure there is no overcrowding or over feeding that could cause any water issues.
How often should I clean my aquarium?
Please don’t pick up the tank to clean the aquarium. We recommend taking the fish out of the water take a fourth (1/4) to third (1/3) of the water out using a gravel vacuum to not only get the water out of the tank but also clean debris that is at the bottom of the tank in your gravel/rocks. You will then use water that you have treated with conditioner and is room temperature into the tank replacing the water that was removed. You should never empty the tank and start over. By draining your tank completely, the beneficial bacterial that fish need will be removed.
How much chemicals do I put into the water?
As every company is different you will need to go by their recommended guidelines as to how much to use.
How can I tell if my fish is sick?

Some of the symptoms you are needing to look for is:

  1. Cloudy Eyes,
  2. Open Skin sores with reddening edges
  3. Sunken body or stomach
  4. Rapid or labored breathing
  5. Refusal of food
  6. Paleness or discoloration of the skin
  7. Fins clamped against body
  8. Ragged and/or frayed fins
  9. Excessive hiding
  10. Erratic or disoriented swimming
  11. White spots on skin or fins
  12. Scratching against decorations or gravel
  13. Red streaks in fins with abnormal lighting of the edges

If a fish shows signs of being sick, it is best to remove them from the aquarium and quarantine the fish by itself in the small tank. treat the sick fish in the quarantine tank rather than medicate and harm the beneficial bacteria. The fish should be treated with the appropriate medication to cure the infection.

Why is my aquarium turning green?

The water can turn green for several reasons:

  1. Too much algae
  2. Too much light
  3. Too many fish

The cure:

  1. Blocking out some of the direct sunlight
  2. Polishing the aquarium by using water
  3. Water changes will reduce the green water but will not eliminate it.

Prevention:

  1. Regular water changes using a gravel siphon to remove waste
  2. Use of an ultra violet sterilizer
  3. Avoid overfeeding fish
  4. Do not overstock the tank
My aquarium water has a bad odor?

The first thing to do is test your water for ammonia and nitrite levels. A smell usually is a gin of excess waste usually from overcrowding or excess food. First if overcrowding remove some of the fish. Then do a partial water change, and clean the bottom of the gravel. If the issue is due to over feeding, please cut back. And please remember that one gallon of water per one inch of fish or if a goldfish 2 gallons per inch of fish.

Didn’t see the question you have? Feel free to contact us at [email protected] we will be happy to help you.

How to Care for Your Plastic Fish Tank

Fish Tank Maintenance

To keep your aquarium looking spotless and your fish healthy it is recommended to siphon off 20% of the aquarium’s water with a gravel vacuum every 3 to 4 weeks depending on the number of fish you have and amount of daily feedings and replace your filter cartridge.

In some cases you may have stubborn algae growing all over the tank and want to remove it. As your fish tank is constructed of impact-resistant plastic the algae cannot be scraped or scrubbed off as damage to the tank may occur. Do not use soap, detergents or glass cleaners as they may leave residues and damage the tank.

Do not use a sponge or scrubber as they may scratch the plastic.

Do not place in dishwasher or very hot water as damage to the tank may occur.

Preparation for Cleaning Tank

You will need to move your fish to another container, preferably a 5-gallon bucket that has never been used with soaps or detergents.

1. Unplug your filter, light, and heater (if used). Take existing water from the fish tank and fill the other container with enough water where your fish will be comfortable while you are cleaning the fish tank.

2. Net your fish out of the fish tank and place them in the other container. Be sure to use an air bubbler or power filter to keep sufficient water movement.

3. Remove ½ of the gravel and place in another container that has never been used with soaps or detergents. Place the container to the side for now.

You can use one of two methods. If you are wanting to give a dirty tank a good cleaning, vinegar and water is a quick and efficient solution.

Vinegar Solution to remove difficult algae or cloudiness caused by hard water build up. White vinegar can be used to clean your tank, filter, plastic plants, decorations, and heater using a 1:1 vinegar/water solution.

1. Using a gravel vacuum, siphon the water from the tank, emptying it completely. You can leave remaining gravel and plastic plants in the aquarium while you are performing cleaning process.

How to Care for Your Plastic Fish Tank

2. Fill a spray bottle with ½ white vinegar and ½ water and spray the inside of the aquarium and decorations. Allow the solution to remain on the tank for 30 minutes before rinsing thoroughly.

3. Refill tank with new water.

4. Then siphon the water completely out with the gravel vacuum.

5. Refill tank ½ with new water and add a tap water conditioner to make water safe.

6. Add the gravel back to the tank you had placed in a container, spreading evenly across the bottom of the tank.

7. From the other container holding your fish, fill a small plastic bag with water and gently net your fish, placing them in the plastic bag. You may need multiple plastic bags depending on the number of fish you have.

8. Fill tank with remaining water from other container. The tank is ready to be used.

9. Place filter and heater (if used) back on tank and turn on. If adding heater, wait 15 minutes before plugging in so it can acclimate to water temperature.

10. Float plastic bags with water and fish on tank’s surface for 10 minutes.

11. Release fish, pouring bag with water gently into tank.

Bleach Solution to remove stubborn algae. Only use regular household bleach, do not use a bleach mixed with other detergents. The recommended solution is usually nine parts water to one part bleach.

1. Using a gravel vacuum, siphon the water from the tank, removing all of the water from the tank completely. You can leave remaining gravel and plastic plants in the aquarium while you are performing cleaning process.

2. In a spray bottle mix 9 parts water to 1 part bleach, a 9-1 water/bleach ratio. Be careful not to splash bleach onto surrounding areas as bleach can be very corrosive.

3. Spray water/bleach solution on areas with algae and grime accumulation. Allow the solution to remain on these spots for 2 hours.

4. Refill tank with new water.

How to Care for Your Plastic Fish Tank

5. Then siphon the water out completely with the gravel vacuum.

6. Refill tank ½ with new water and add a tap water conditioner to make water safe.

7. Add the gravel back to the tank you had placed in a container, spreading evenly across the bottom of the tank.

8. From the other container holding your fish, fill a small plastic bag with water and gently net your fish, placing them in the plastic bag. You may need multiple plastic bags depending on the number of fish you have.

9. Place filter and heater (if used) back on tank and turn on. If adding heater, wait 15 minutes before plugging in so it can acclimate to water temperature.

10. Float plastic bags with water and fish on tank’s surface for 10 minutes.

11. Release fish, pouring bag with water gently into tank.

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